2021-9-23 #magazine
2021-9-14
is an online magazine of #philosophy, cultural, and sociopolitical analysis. #politics
#magazine
2021-9-7
The purpose of this blog is to throw the light of being directly onto what (scandalously) goes by the name of ‘#politics’ today. All that is one-sided will be exposed as two-sided; all that is shrouded in mystery will be held to the light without disenchantment; all that is narcissistic will be transformed into true love.
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2021-9-7
We produce hard-hitting independent journalism on civil liberties, #politics, #technology, #culture, policy, and commerce. As the magazine of free minds and free markets, Reason exists outside of the left/right echo chamber. Our goal is to deliver fresh, unbiased information and insights to our readers, viewers, and listeners every day.
#magazine
2021-9-6 #article
2021-9-2
is an independent media organisation addressing the issues that are set to define the 21st century, from a crisis of capitalism to racism and climate change. Within that context our goal is a simple one: to tell stories and provide analysis shaped by the political uncertainties of the age, elevating critical perspectives you’re unlikely to find elsewhere. Driven to build a new #media for a different #politics, our journalism is always politically committed; rather than seeking to moderate between two sides of a debate, our output actively intends to feed back into political action.
#magazine
2021-8-28
#Culture and #politics are downstream of economics, but all three are downstream of #technology (much to the annoyance of both culture and politics).
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2021-8-21
the publications of the #American Humanist Association, provide news, opinion, and information. They apply humanism—a rational #philosophy without theism or other supernatural beliefs that is informed by #science, guided by reason, inspired by art, and motivated by compassion—to commentary on #politics, science, #technology, art, and #culture. They also highlight the activities of humanists, including the programs and achievements of the AHA. They seek to provide a wide range of material that strives for ethical cohesion while also exploring where humanists diverge—not to further divide but to air, discuss, elucidate, and continually refine humanism.
#magazine
2021-8-20 #magazine
2021-8-18
I’m a #software developer currently living in #Germany. My focus nowadays is the web, but I love to tinker with electronics, learn new programming languages and platforms. I will try out anything tech-related I find interesting.
With over twelve years of experience in IT, I’ve changed several #technology stacks during that time. To mention all of it would be out of this scope, so I’ll leave it for a future entry (read: there’s a high chance it won’t happen). In my career, I worked both as an independent freelancer and a full-time employee for some pretty cool companies.
I take great interest in the impact of technology on #society and #politics. As a person who’s fascinated with ones and zeroes from an early age, I always liked to think about how we can make this world a better place through tech.
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2021-8-13
The Critic is Britain’s monthly magazine for #politics, ideas, art, #literature and much more.
#magazine
2021-8-11
is a print and #digital magazine of #literature, #culture, and #politics published three times a year. We also post new online-only work several times each week and publish #books expanding on the interests of the magazine.
#magazine
2021-8-8
Are children better off than their parents? This highly debated question in #politics and economics is investigated by analysing the trends in absolute and relative intergenerational labour income mobility for #Germany and the US. High quality panel data is used for this purpose; the SOEP for Germany and the PSID for the US. In Germany, 67% of sons born between 1955 and 1975 earned a significantly higher real long-run labour income than their fathers. Those with fathers from the lowest earnings bracket were particularly mobile in absolute terms. In contrast, the fraction of US sons earning more than their fathers is 60% on average for the same cohorts. Their share decreased from 66% in the 1956–60 birth cohort to 48% in the 1971–75 birth cohort, while it changed very little in Germany. Overall, absolute as well as relative labour income mobility is larger in Germany than in the US.
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